{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:samcook..areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:astrobob.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":2624,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"astrobob.areavoices.com/105973","permalink":"http://astrobob.areavoices.com/2014/07/21/moon-nestles-in-the-hyades-then-departs-for-venus/","blogid":"85","blogdomain":"astrobob.areavoices.com","hostname":"astrobob.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Moon nestles in Hyades then departs for Venus ","content":"[caption id=\"attachment_105974\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"721\"] The crescent moon slips in front of the Hyades star cluster only a degree from Aldebaran tomorrow morning. Don't miss the other bright star cluster, the Pleiades, just above. Look low in the northeastern sky about an hour before sunrise to catch the scene. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThat old devil moon's up to its old tricks again. Tomorrow morning, early risers will see it tucked inside the V-shaped face of Taurus the Bull. Better known as the Hyades star cluster, look for the crescent to pass just 1° north of the bright star Aldebaran. A pair of binoculars will enhance the view by pulling in more stars and revealing details in the spooky, earth-lit moon. Sunlight illuminates the lunar crescent, but the remainder is light reflecting off Earth out to the moon and back again.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105977\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] The crescent is lit by the sun while the remainder glows dimly from twice-reflected light called earthshine. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nTo the eye, 'earthlight' looks smoky gray and nearly featureless though binoculars will show the lunar seas and larger craters. The quality of the light mimics a lunar eclipse but instead of red we see the pale blue glow of sunlight reflecting back from our planet's oceans.\n\nAt 153 light years, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster to our solar system, one of the reasons you can see it without a telescope. Aldebaran appears to be a full-fledged cluster member, but it's a ruse. The bright, ruddy star lies much closer to us along the same line of sight.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105978\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"400\"] Venus and a very thin crescent moon on July 24 about 45 minutes before sunrise low in the northeast. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThe Hyades were born in a dense cloud of interstellar dust and gas 625 million years ago around the time underwater life flourished in the late Precambrian era. When you gaze at the cluster tomorrow, the light that touches your retinas left the Hyades the same time Abraham Lincoln took office.\n\nThe moon moves on toward Venus after vacationing in the Hyades, passing south of the planet on Thursday morning. It will be extremely thin that morning and should make a pretty sight for anyone looking low in the northeastern sky 45 minutes before sunrise.","rawcontent":"[caption id=\"attachment_105974\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"721\"] The crescent moon slips in front of the Hyades star cluster only a degree from Aldebaran tomorrow morning. Don't miss the other bright star cluster, the Pleiades, just above. Look low in the northeastern sky about an hour before sunrise to catch the scene. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThat old devil moon's up to its old tricks again. Tomorrow morning, early risers will see it tucked inside the V-shaped face of Taurus the Bull. Better known as the Hyades star cluster, look for the crescent to pass just 1 north of the bright star Aldebaran. A pair of binoculars will enhance the view by pulling in more stars and revealing details in the spooky, earth-lit moon. Sunlight illuminates the lunar crescent, but the remainder is light reflecting off Earth out to the moon and back again.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105977\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] The crescent is lit by the sun while the remainder glows dimly from twice-reflected light called earthshine. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nTo the eye, 'earthlight' looks smoky gray and nearly featureless though binoculars will show the lunar seas and larger craters. The quality of the light mimics a lunar eclipse but instead of red we see the pale blue glow of sunlight reflecting back from our planet's oceans.\n\nAt 153 light years, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster to our solar system, one of the reasons you can see it without a telescope. Aldebaran appears to be a full-fledged cluster member, but it's a ruse. The bright, ruddy star lies much closer to us along the same line of sight.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105978\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"400\"] Venus and a very thin crescent moon on July 24 about 45 minutes before sunrise low in the northeast. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThe Hyades were born in a dense cloud of interstellar dust and gas 625 million years ago around the time underwater life flourished in the late Precambrian era. When you gaze at the cluster tomorrow, the light that touches your retinas left the Hyades the same time Abraham Lincoln took office.\n\nThe moon moves on toward Venus after vacationing in the Hyades, passing south of the planet on Thursday morning. It will be extremely thin that morning and should make a pretty sight for anyone looking low in the northeastern sky 45 minutes before sunrise.","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nThat old devil moon's up to its old tricks again. Tomorrow morning, early risers will see it tucked inside the V-shaped face of Taurus the Bull. Better known as the Hyades star cluster, look for the crescent to pass just 1 north of the bright star Aldebaran. A pair of binoculars will enhance the view by pulling in more stars and revealing details in the spooky, earth-lit moon. Sunlight illuminates the lunar crescent, but the remainder is light reflecting off Earth out to the moon and back again.\n\n\n\nTo the eye, 'earthlight' looks smoky gray and nearly featureless though binoculars will show the lunar seas and larger craters. The quality of the light mimics a lunar eclipse but instead of red we see the pale blue glow of sunlight reflecting back from our planet's oceans.\n\nAt 153 light years, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster to our solar system, one of the reasons you can see it without a telescope. Aldebaran appears to be a full-fledged cluster member, but it's a ruse. The bright, ruddy star lies much closer to us along the same line of sight.\n\n\n\nThe Hyades were born in a dense cloud of interstellar dust and gas 625 million years ago around the time underwater life flourished in the late Precambrian era. When you gaze at the cluster tomorrow, the light that touches your retinas left the Hyades the same time Abraham Lincoln took office.\n\nThe moon moves on toward Venus after vacationing in the Hyades, passing south of the planet on Thursday morning. It will be extremely thin that morning and should make a pretty sight for anyone looking low in the northeastern sky 45 minutes before sunrise.","numcomments":0,"author":"astrobob","author_s":"http://astrobob.areavoices.com/author/astrobob/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-21T17:21:56Z","displaydate":"2014-07-21 12:21:56","displaymodified":"2014-07-21 12:31:18","tags":["crescent","earthshine","Hyades","moon","Venus"],"spell":["Moon nestles in Hyades then departs for Venus ","[caption id=\"attachment_105974\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"721\"] The crescent moon slips in front of the Hyades star cluster only a degree from Aldebaran tomorrow morning. Don't miss the other bright star cluster, the Pleiades, just above. Look low in the northeastern sky about an hour before sunrise to catch the scene. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThat old devil moon's up to its old tricks again. Tomorrow morning, early risers will see it tucked inside the V-shaped face of Taurus the Bull. Better known as the Hyades star cluster, look for the crescent to pass just 1° north of the bright star Aldebaran. A pair of binoculars will enhance the view by pulling in more stars and revealing details in the spooky, earth-lit moon. Sunlight illuminates the lunar crescent, but the remainder is light reflecting off Earth out to the moon and back again.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105977\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"400\"] The crescent is lit by the sun while the remainder glows dimly from twice-reflected light called earthshine. Credit: Bob King[/caption]\n\nTo the eye, 'earthlight' looks smoky gray and nearly featureless though binoculars will show the lunar seas and larger craters. The quality of the light mimics a lunar eclipse but instead of red we see the pale blue glow of sunlight reflecting back from our planet's oceans.\n\nAt 153 light years, the Hyades is the nearest star cluster to our solar system, one of the reasons you can see it without a telescope. Aldebaran appears to be a full-fledged cluster member, but it's a ruse. The bright, ruddy star lies much closer to us along the same line of sight.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_105978\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"400\"] Venus and a very thin crescent moon on July 24 about 45 minutes before sunrise low in the northeast. Stellarium[/caption]\n\nThe Hyades were born in a dense cloud of interstellar dust and gas 625 million years ago around the time underwater life flourished in the late Precambrian era. When you gaze at the cluster tomorrow, the light that touches your retinas left the Hyades the same time Abraham Lincoln took office.\n\nThe moon moves on toward Venus after vacationing in the Hyades, passing south of the planet on Thursday morning. It will be extremely thin that morning and should make a pretty sight for anyone looking low in the northeastern sky 45 minutes before sunrise.","astrobob"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:chefjeff.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":836,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"chefjeff.areavoices.com/87528","permalink":"http://chefjeff.areavoices.com/2013/02/08/chipotle-black-bean-chili/","blogid":"200","blogdomain":"chefjeff.areavoices.com","hostname":"chefjeff.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Chipotle Black Bean Chili","content":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isn’t a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that I’ll make when she’s out of town.\n\nBut that’s not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","rawcontent":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isnt a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that Ill make when shes out of town.\n\nBut thats not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","contentnoshortcodes":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isnt a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that Ill make when shes out of town.\n\nBut thats not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","numcomments":0,"author":"chefjeff","author_s":"http://chefjeff.areavoices.com/author/chefjeff/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-02-08T19:31:13Z","displaydate":"2013-02-08 14:31:13","displaymodified":"2013-02-08 14:31:13","tags":["Beans","black beans","chef jeff","chili","food","jeff tiedeman","recipes"],"spell":["Chipotle Black Bean Chili","Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isn’t a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that I’ll make when she’s out of town.\n\nBut that’s not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","chefjeff"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:eastofweedin.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":30,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"eastofweedin.areavoices.com/211","permalink":"http://eastofweedin.areavoices.com/2013/09/27/eating-during-a-time-of-chaos/","blogid":"17890","blogdomain":"eastofweedin.areavoices.com","hostname":"eastofweedin.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Eating during a time of chaos","content":"Since our baby was born in June, our diets have not been all that great. Managing three kids is different than two, especially when one of them is pretty demanding. Nearly four months out though, I've decided as a family we needed to get back on track. So yesterday our dinner came entirely from the farmer's market.\n\nThere is some junk at the market but most of the products are healthy. I bought apples, carrots, brussel sprouts, red bell peppers and a couple of grass-fed sirloin steaks. As suppers go it was an easy one. I threw some olive oil and salt and pepper on the brussel sprouts and roasted them. My husband grilled the steaks and I  put out sliced peppers as a pre-dinner snack. Everyone ate without complaint. It was awesome.\n\nWith all the chaos of having a new baby, we had started eating more packaged food, thinking that it was the easier route. But last night's meal was just as simple and a whole lot more healthful. Going forward I need to remind myself that healthy eating doesn't have to be complicated. In fact my kids seem prefer the simple.\n\nSpeaking of simple, I have a ton of tomatoes and I was looking for a new way to use them. I ran across a recipe for a tomato and mozzarella quesadillas. I simply threw some mozzerella on a tortilla with some sliced tomatoes and a little basil and grilled it. It was pretty tasty.\n\n ","rawcontent":"Since our baby was born in June, our diets have not been all that great. Managing three kids is different than two, especially when one of them is pretty demanding. Nearly four months out though, I've decided as a family we needed to get back on track. So yesterday our dinner came entirely from the farmer's market.\n\nThere is some junk at the market but most of the products are healthy. I bought apples, carrots, brussel sprouts, red bell peppers and a couple of grass-fed sirloin steaks. As suppers go it was an easy one. I threw some olive oil and salt and pepper on the brussel sprouts and roasted them. My husband grilled the steaks and I put out sliced peppers as a pre-dinner snack. Everyone ate without complaint. It was awesome.\n\nWith all the chaos of having a new baby, we had started eating more packaged food, thinking that it was the easier route. But last night's meal was just as simple and a whole lot more healthful. Going forward I need to remind myself that healthy eating doesn't have to be complicated. In fact my kids seem prefer the simple.\n\nSpeaking of simple, I have a ton of tomatoes and I was looking for a new way to use them. I ran across a recipe for a tomato and mozzarella quesadillas. I simply threw some mozzerella on a tortilla with some sliced tomatoes and a little basil and grilled it. It was pretty tasty.\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Since our baby was born in June, our diets have not been all that great. Managing three kids is different than two, especially when one of them is pretty demanding. Nearly four months out though, I've decided as a family we needed to get back on track. So yesterday our dinner came entirely from the farmer's market.\n\nThere is some junk at the market but most of the products are healthy. I bought apples, carrots, brussel sprouts, red bell peppers and a couple of grass-fed sirloin steaks. As suppers go it was an easy one. I threw some olive oil and salt and pepper on the brussel sprouts and roasted them. My husband grilled the steaks and I put out sliced peppers as a pre-dinner snack. Everyone ate without complaint. It was awesome.\n\nWith all the chaos of having a new baby, we had started eating more packaged food, thinking that it was the easier route. But last night's meal was just as simple and a whole lot more healthful. Going forward I need to remind myself that healthy eating doesn't have to be complicated. In fact my kids seem prefer the simple.\n\nSpeaking of simple, I have a ton of tomatoes and I was looking for a new way to use them. I ran across a recipe for a tomato and mozzarella quesadillas. I simply threw some mozzerella on a tortilla with some sliced tomatoes and a little basil and grilled it. It was pretty tasty.\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Emily Zimmer","author_s":"http://eastofweedin.areavoices.com/author/ezimmer/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-09-27T16:48:17Z","displaydate":"2013-09-27 16:48:17","displaymodified":"2013-09-27 16:48:17","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Eating during a time of chaos","Since our baby was born in June, our diets have not been all that great. Managing three kids is different than two, especially when one of them is pretty demanding. Nearly four months out though, I've decided as a family we needed to get back on track. So yesterday our dinner came entirely from the farmer's market.\n\nThere is some junk at the market but most of the products are healthy. I bought apples, carrots, brussel sprouts, red bell peppers and a couple of grass-fed sirloin steaks. As suppers go it was an easy one. I threw some olive oil and salt and pepper on the brussel sprouts and roasted them. My husband grilled the steaks and I  put out sliced peppers as a pre-dinner snack. Everyone ate without complaint. It was awesome.\n\nWith all the chaos of having a new baby, we had started eating more packaged food, thinking that it was the easier route. But last night's meal was just as simple and a whole lot more healthful. Going forward I need to remind myself that healthy eating doesn't have to be complicated. In fact my kids seem prefer the simple.\n\nSpeaking of simple, I have a ton of tomatoes and I was looking for a new way to use them. I ran across a recipe for a tomato and mozzarella quesadillas. I simply threw some mozzerella on a tortilla with some sliced tomatoes and a little basil and grilled it. It was pretty tasty.\n\n ","Emily Zimmer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":27,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com/104","permalink":"http://minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com/2013/12/23/seasons-over-the-trade-failed/","blogid":"2882","blogdomain":"minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com","hostname":"minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Season's over, the trade failed!","content":"In a previous entry, I noted the decision to trade my fantasy football league draft picks in order to move up and draft Adrian Peterson.\nAt the end of the season ... it was a bad idea. I made the playoffs, but lost in the first round. And AP had a sub-par season, like the rest of the Vikings. Never again will I trade up for a Viking.\nIt was a long season of frustration. I could have had LeSean McCoy, and at least when he had a bad game or got injured it wouldn't have bothered both my actual and fantasy teams. Of course, the team I traded with didn't even make the playoffs, so ... maybe it wasn't the worst idea after all.","rawcontent":"In a previous entry, I noted the decision to trade my fantasy football league draft picks in order to move up and draft Adrian Peterson.\nAt the end of the season ... it was a bad idea. I made the playoffs, but lost in the first round. And AP had a sub-par season, like the rest of the Vikings. Never again will I trade up for a Viking.\nIt was a long season of frustration. I could have had LeSean McCoy, and at least when he had a bad game or got injured it wouldn't have bothered both my actual and fantasy teams. Of course, the team I traded with didn't even make the playoffs, so ... maybe it wasn't the worst idea after all.","contentnoshortcodes":"In a previous entry, I noted the decision to trade my fantasy football league draft picks in order to move up and draft Adrian Peterson.\nAt the end of the season ... it was a bad idea. I made the playoffs, but lost in the first round. And AP had a sub-par season, like the rest of the Vikings. Never again will I trade up for a Viking.\nIt was a long season of frustration. I could have had LeSean McCoy, and at least when he had a bad game or got injured it wouldn't have bothered both my actual and fantasy teams. Of course, the team I traded with didn't even make the playoffs, so ... maybe it wasn't the worst idea after all.","numcomments":0,"author":"Chad Hjellming","author_s":"http://minnesotasportsmind.areavoices.com/author/kirby34/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-12-23T22:18:06Z","displaydate":"2013-12-23 22:18:06","displaymodified":"2013-12-23 22:20:20","tags":["vikings"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Season's over, the trade failed!","In a previous entry, I noted the decision to trade my fantasy football league draft picks in order to move up and draft Adrian Peterson.\nAt the end of the season ... it was a bad idea. I made the playoffs, but lost in the first round. And AP had a sub-par season, like the rest of the Vikings. Never again will I trade up for a Viking.\nIt was a long season of frustration. I could have had LeSean McCoy, and at least when he had a bad game or got injured it wouldn't have bothered both my actual and fantasy teams. Of course, the team I traded with didn't even make the playoffs, so ... maybe it wasn't the worst idea after all.","Chad Hjellming"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:chainringtattoo.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:rosemountrotary.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":83,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"rosemountrotary.areavoices.com/460","permalink":"http://rosemountrotary.areavoices.com/2014/07/16/may-2014-student-of-the-month-ryan-condon/","blogid":"2599","blogdomain":"rosemountrotary.areavoices.com","hostname":"rosemountrotary.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"May 2014 Student of the Month: Ryan Condon ","content":"\n\nThe Rotary Club of Rosemount is pleased to announce that Rosemount High School senior Ryan Condon was its Student of the Month for May 2014.\n\nAs a Rosemount High School student, Ryan challenged himself by taking many honors, AP, and CIS classes.  He earned an academic letter each year during high school.  He is a member of the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, and Tri-M Honor Society.  He also participated in the RHS concert band each year during high school.\n\nRyan’s passion for athletics was evident in his extracurricular activities. He ran hundreds of miles throughout Rosemount as he trained for track and cross-country events. During his high school career, he earned eleven varsity letters in three sports. He served as captain of two teams, and during his senior year, he was named Academic All-State in Cross-Country.\n\nService has also played a significant role in Ryan’s life. In 2008, Ryan’s father passed away after a ten-year battle with cancer. Ryan’s father played a key role in Ryan’s development as a young man, and he encouraged Ryan to seek out positive mentors and to give back when he could. Ryan followed his father’s lead in Scouting. As a Scout, Ryan helped with dozens of Eagle Scout projects after completing his own. He also became a Scout instructor.\n\nRyan credits service for helping him to avoid self-pity after his father’s death. It also revealed to him that many struggle with significant challenges like the one his family faced. He participated in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life for over a decade. Ryan also served as a volunteer ski instructor for an organization called Padraig’s Place. Each Saturday morning during the winter, Ryan joined a group of volunteers at Buck Hill to help mentally and physically challenged youth ski and enjoy the outdoors.\n\nWith high school graduation now behind him, Ryan will continue to serve as he joins the U.S. Coast Guard. He reported for duty on June 30, 2014 and is attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut.","rawcontent":"\n\nThe Rotary Club of Rosemount is pleased to announce that Rosemount High School senior Ryan Condon was its Student of the Month for May 2014.\n\nAs a Rosemount High School student, Ryan challenged himself by taking many honors, AP, and CIS classes. He earned an academic letter each year during high school. He is a member of the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, and Tri-M Honor Society. He also participated in the RHS concert band each year during high school.\n\nRyans passion for athletics was evident in his extracurricular activities. He ran hundreds of miles throughout Rosemount as he trained for track and cross-country events. During his high school career, he earned eleven varsity letters in three sports. He served as captain of two teams, and during his senior year, he was named Academic All-State in Cross-Country.\n\nService has also played a significant role in Ryans life. In 2008, Ryans father passed away after a ten-year battle with cancer. Ryans father played a key role in Ryans development as a young man, and he encouraged Ryan to seek out positive mentors and to give back when he could. Ryan followed his fathers lead in Scouting. As a Scout, Ryan helped with dozens of Eagle Scout projects after completing his own. He also became a Scout instructor.\n\nRyan credits service for helping him to avoid self-pity after his fathers death. It also revealed to him that many struggle with significant challenges like the one his family faced. He participated in the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life for over a decade. Ryan also served as a volunteer ski instructor for an organization called Padraigs Place. Each Saturday morning during the winter, Ryan joined a group of volunteers at Buck Hill to help mentally and physically challenged youth ski and enjoy the outdoors.\n\nWith high school graduation now behind him, Ryan will continue to serve as he joins the U.S. Coast Guard. He reported for duty on June 30, 2014 and is attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut.","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nThe Rotary Club of Rosemount is pleased to announce that Rosemount High School senior Ryan Condon was its Student of the Month for May 2014.\n\nAs a Rosemount High School student, Ryan challenged himself by taking many honors, AP, and CIS classes. He earned an academic letter each year during high school. He is a member of the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, and Tri-M Honor Society. He also participated in the RHS concert band each year during high school.\n\nRyans passion for athletics was evident in his extracurricular activities. He ran hundreds of miles throughout Rosemount as he trained for track and cross-country events. During his high school career, he earned eleven varsity letters in three sports. He served as captain of two teams, and during his senior year, he was named Academic All-State in Cross-Country.\n\nService has also played a significant role in Ryans life. In 2008, Ryans father passed away after a ten-year battle with cancer. Ryans father played a key role in Ryans development as a young man, and he encouraged Ryan to seek out positive mentors and to give back when he could. Ryan followed his fathers lead in Scouting. As a Scout, Ryan helped with dozens of Eagle Scout projects after completing his own. He also became a Scout instructor.\n\nRyan credits service for helping him to avoid self-pity after his fathers death. It also revealed to him that many struggle with significant challenges like the one his family faced. He participated in the American Cancer Societys Relay for Life for over a decade. Ryan also served as a volunteer ski instructor for an organization called Padraigs Place. Each Saturday morning during the winter, Ryan joined a group of volunteers at Buck Hill to help mentally and physically challenged youth ski and enjoy the outdoors.\n\nWith high school graduation now behind him, Ryan will continue to serve as he joins the U.S. Coast Guard. He reported for duty on June 30, 2014 and is attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut.","numcomments":0,"author":"Rotary Club of Rosemount","author_s":"http://rosemountrotary.areavoices.com/author/rosemountrotary/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-16T15:46:41Z","displaydate":"2014-07-16 10:46:41","displaymodified":"2014-07-16 10:52:47","categories":["Rosemount","Rotary International","Student of the Month","Uncategorized"],"spell":["May 2014 Student of the Month: Ryan Condon ","\n\nThe Rotary Club of Rosemount is pleased to announce that Rosemount High School senior Ryan Condon was its Student of the Month for May 2014.\n\nAs a Rosemount High School student, Ryan challenged himself by taking many honors, AP, and CIS classes.  He earned an academic letter each year during high school.  He is a member of the National Honor Society, National Spanish Honor Society, and Tri-M Honor Society.  He also participated in the RHS concert band each year during high school.\n\nRyan’s passion for athletics was evident in his extracurricular activities. He ran hundreds of miles throughout Rosemount as he trained for track and cross-country events. During his high school career, he earned eleven varsity letters in three sports. He served as captain of two teams, and during his senior year, he was named Academic All-State in Cross-Country.\n\nService has also played a significant role in Ryan’s life. In 2008, Ryan’s father passed away after a ten-year battle with cancer. Ryan’s father played a key role in Ryan’s development as a young man, and he encouraged Ryan to seek out positive mentors and to give back when he could. Ryan followed his father’s lead in Scouting. As a Scout, Ryan helped with dozens of Eagle Scout projects after completing his own. He also became a Scout instructor.\n\nRyan credits service for helping him to avoid self-pity after his father’s death. It also revealed to him that many struggle with significant challenges like the one his family faced. He participated in the American Cancer Society’s Relay for Life for over a decade. Ryan also served as a volunteer ski instructor for an organization called Padraig’s Place. Each Saturday morning during the winter, Ryan joined a group of volunteers at Buck Hill to help mentally and physically challenged youth ski and enjoy the outdoors.\n\nWith high school graduation now behind him, Ryan will continue to serve as he joins the U.S. Coast Guard. He reported for duty on June 30, 2014 and is attending the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Connecticut.","Rotary Club of Rosemount"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:mrcirosemount.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:capitolchat.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":4268,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"capitolchat.areavoices.com/94860","permalink":"http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/2014/07/17/farmington-leaders-offer-to-host-special-legislative-session/","blogid":"171","blogdomain":"capitolchat.areavoices.com","hostname":"capitolchat.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session","content":"[caption id=\"attachment_94861\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"800\"] Pitching Farmington[/caption]\nBy Don Davis\nLeaders of the southern Twin Cities suburb of Farmington Thursday offered to host a special legislative session to fund flood recovery.\n\"Minnesota has a proud tradition of coming together to provide relief for those in need following natural disasters, and Farmington would be a unique and well-suited location to host any upcoming special session given the current state of the Capitol,\" state Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said.\nThe invitation came as much of the Capitol building is closed for a $273 million renovation. However, state officials say the House and Senate chambers and some meeting rooms will be available if Gov. Mark Dayton needs to call a special session.\nWhile the governor's office and House speaker did not reject the Farmington proposal, neither did they give it much hope.\n\"It is an intriguing idea,\" House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, said. \"However, there are questions in terms of costs and feasibility.\"\nDayton press secretary Matt Swenson said a special session, which is not a certainty, would need agreement among all four legislative leaders and the governor.\n\"While Rep. Garafolo’s idea is an interesting one, the additional costs incurred by holding a special session outside the Capitol would need to be considered...\" Swenson said. \"Gov. Dayton’s primary concern is ensuring Minnesotans affected by this summer’s flooding get the help they need as quickly as possible.”\nFloods that affected more than half of Minnesota's counties likely will bring a presidential disaster declaration, but even though the federal government would pay for most flood recovery costs, the state would be on the hook for 25 percent. That probably means the Legislature will need to convene to appropriate the money.\nMost disaster recovery funding sessions last less than a day and are routine.\nFarmington residents said they can offer lawmakers a home away from Capitol construction and it would give them a chance to toot their own horn.\n\"We are small town Minnesota nice, but with big city dreams,\" Farmington High School student Natalie Pellin said.\nSchool officials proposed using iPad technology they already have in their 5-year-old school to record votes.\n\"Farmington High School has the space and technology to host a legislative special session, and this is a chance for legislators to see firsthand the technology our students are using to help improve our education outcomes in the classroom,\" Chairwoman Tera Lee of the Farmington School Board said.\nFarmington Mayor Todd Larson said that holding the session in his community would showcase his entire community.\nGarofalo said he is concerned with technological issues during a special session in the Capitol because some recording systems have been removed. He also expressed concerns about the public's safety in a construction zone.\nHowever, even though the Capitol will remain mostly closed next year, he said that he does not have the same concerns during next year's regular session that begins in January and could last into May.\nGarofalo admitted that the Farmington suggestion could set off a competition among cities around Minnesota to host the session. Soon after Farmington leaders talked to reporters, Rep. Joe Radinovich, D-Crosby, tweeted that his area would be a good location.\n\"This is purely to showcase the accomplishments of Farmington,\" Garofalo said.\n\n","rawcontent":"[caption id=\"attachment_94861\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"800\"] Pitching Farmington[/caption]\nBy Don Davis\nLeaders of the southern Twin Cities suburb of Farmington Thursday offered to host a special legislative session to fund flood recovery.\n\"Minnesota has a proud tradition of coming together to provide relief for those in need following natural disasters, and Farmington would be a unique and well-suited location to host any upcoming special session given the current state of the Capitol,\" state Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said.\nThe invitation came as much of the Capitol building is closed for a $273 million renovation. However, state officials say the House and Senate chambers and some meeting rooms will be available if Gov. Mark Dayton needs to call a special session.\nWhile the governor's office and House speaker did not reject the Farmington proposal, neither did they give it much hope.\n\"It is an intriguing idea,\" House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, said. \"However, there are questions in terms of costs and feasibility.\"\nDayton press secretary Matt Swenson said a special session, which is not a certainty, would need agreement among all four legislative leaders and the governor.\n\"While Rep. Garafolos idea is an interesting one, the additional costs incurred by holding a special session outside the Capitol would need to be considered...\" Swenson said. \"Gov. Daytons primary concern is ensuring Minnesotans affected by this summers flooding get the help they need as quickly as possible.\nFloods that affected more than half of Minnesota's counties likely will bring a presidential disaster declaration, but even though the federal government would pay for most flood recovery costs, the state would be on the hook for 25 percent. That probably means the Legislature will need to convene to appropriate the money.\nMost disaster recovery funding sessions last less than a day and are routine.\nFarmington residents said they can offer lawmakers a home away from Capitol construction and it would give them a chance to toot their own horn.\n\"We are small town Minnesota nice, but with big city dreams,\" Farmington High School student Natalie Pellin said.\nSchool officials proposed using iPad technology they already have in their 5-year-old school to record votes.\n\"Farmington High School has the space and technology to host a legislative special session, and this is a chance for legislators to see firsthand the technology our students are using to help improve our education outcomes in the classroom,\" Chairwoman Tera Lee of the Farmington School Board said.\nFarmington Mayor Todd Larson said that holding the session in his community would showcase his entire community.\nGarofalo said he is concerned with technological issues during a special session in the Capitol because some recording systems have been removed. He also expressed concerns about the public's safety in a construction zone.\nHowever, even though the Capitol will remain mostly closed next year, he said that he does not have the same concerns during next year's regular session that begins in January and could last into May.\nGarofalo admitted that the Farmington suggestion could set off a competition among cities around Minnesota to host the session. Soon after Farmington leaders talked to reporters, Rep. Joe Radinovich, D-Crosby, tweeted that his area would be a good location.\n\"This is purely to showcase the accomplishments of Farmington,\" Garofalo said.\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"\nBy Don Davis\nLeaders of the southern Twin Cities suburb of Farmington Thursday offered to host a special legislative session to fund flood recovery.\n\"Minnesota has a proud tradition of coming together to provide relief for those in need following natural disasters, and Farmington would be a unique and well-suited location to host any upcoming special session given the current state of the Capitol,\" state Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said.\nThe invitation came as much of the Capitol building is closed for a $273 million renovation. However, state officials say the House and Senate chambers and some meeting rooms will be available if Gov. Mark Dayton needs to call a special session.\nWhile the governor's office and House speaker did not reject the Farmington proposal, neither did they give it much hope.\n\"It is an intriguing idea,\" House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, said. \"However, there are questions in terms of costs and feasibility.\"\nDayton press secretary Matt Swenson said a special session, which is not a certainty, would need agreement among all four legislative leaders and the governor.\n\"While Rep. Garafolos idea is an interesting one, the additional costs incurred by holding a special session outside the Capitol would need to be considered...\" Swenson said. \"Gov. Daytons primary concern is ensuring Minnesotans affected by this summers flooding get the help they need as quickly as possible.\nFloods that affected more than half of Minnesota's counties likely will bring a presidential disaster declaration, but even though the federal government would pay for most flood recovery costs, the state would be on the hook for 25 percent. That probably means the Legislature will need to convene to appropriate the money.\nMost disaster recovery funding sessions last less than a day and are routine.\nFarmington residents said they can offer lawmakers a home away from Capitol construction and it would give them a chance to toot their own horn.\n\"We are small town Minnesota nice, but with big city dreams,\" Farmington High School student Natalie Pellin said.\nSchool officials proposed using iPad technology they already have in their 5-year-old school to record votes.\n\"Farmington High School has the space and technology to host a legislative special session, and this is a chance for legislators to see firsthand the technology our students are using to help improve our education outcomes in the classroom,\" Chairwoman Tera Lee of the Farmington School Board said.\nFarmington Mayor Todd Larson said that holding the session in his community would showcase his entire community.\nGarofalo said he is concerned with technological issues during a special session in the Capitol because some recording systems have been removed. He also expressed concerns about the public's safety in a construction zone.\nHowever, even though the Capitol will remain mostly closed next year, he said that he does not have the same concerns during next year's regular session that begins in January and could last into May.\nGarofalo admitted that the Farmington suggestion could set off a competition among cities around Minnesota to host the session. Soon after Farmington leaders talked to reporters, Rep. Joe Radinovich, D-Crosby, tweeted that his area would be a good location.\n\"This is purely to showcase the accomplishments of Farmington,\" Garofalo said.\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Don Davis","author_s":"http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/author/capitolchat/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-17T21:57:23Z","displaydate":"2014-07-17 16:57:23","displaymodified":"2014-07-17 16:57:23","tags":["farmington","joe radinovich","legislature","matt swenson","natalie pellin","pat garofalo","paul thissen","special session","tera lee","todd larson"],"categories":["Minnesota government"],"spell":["Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session","[caption id=\"attachment_94861\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"800\"] Pitching Farmington[/caption]\nBy Don Davis\nLeaders of the southern Twin Cities suburb of Farmington Thursday offered to host a special legislative session to fund flood recovery.\n\"Minnesota has a proud tradition of coming together to provide relief for those in need following natural disasters, and Farmington would be a unique and well-suited location to host any upcoming special session given the current state of the Capitol,\" state Rep. Pat Garofalo, R-Farmington, said.\nThe invitation came as much of the Capitol building is closed for a $273 million renovation. However, state officials say the House and Senate chambers and some meeting rooms will be available if Gov. Mark Dayton needs to call a special session.\nWhile the governor's office and House speaker did not reject the Farmington proposal, neither did they give it much hope.\n\"It is an intriguing idea,\" House Speaker Paul Thissen, D-Minneapolis, said. \"However, there are questions in terms of costs and feasibility.\"\nDayton press secretary Matt Swenson said a special session, which is not a certainty, would need agreement among all four legislative leaders and the governor.\n\"While Rep. Garafolo’s idea is an interesting one, the additional costs incurred by holding a special session outside the Capitol would need to be considered...\" Swenson said. \"Gov. Dayton’s primary concern is ensuring Minnesotans affected by this summer’s flooding get the help they need as quickly as possible.”\nFloods that affected more than half of Minnesota's counties likely will bring a presidential disaster declaration, but even though the federal government would pay for most flood recovery costs, the state would be on the hook for 25 percent. That probably means the Legislature will need to convene to appropriate the money.\nMost disaster recovery funding sessions last less than a day and are routine.\nFarmington residents said they can offer lawmakers a home away from Capitol construction and it would give them a chance to toot their own horn.\n\"We are small town Minnesota nice, but with big city dreams,\" Farmington High School student Natalie Pellin said.\nSchool officials proposed using iPad technology they already have in their 5-year-old school to record votes.\n\"Farmington High School has the space and technology to host a legislative special session, and this is a chance for legislators to see firsthand the technology our students are using to help improve our education outcomes in the classroom,\" Chairwoman Tera Lee of the Farmington School Board said.\nFarmington Mayor Todd Larson said that holding the session in his community would showcase his entire community.\nGarofalo said he is concerned with technological issues during a special session in the Capitol because some recording systems have been removed. He also expressed concerns about the public's safety in a construction zone.\nHowever, even though the Capitol will remain mostly closed next year, he said that he does not have the same concerns during next year's regular session that begins in January and could last into May.\nGarofalo admitted that the Farmington suggestion could set off a competition among cities around Minnesota to host the session. Soon after Farmington leaders talked to reporters, Rep. Joe Radinovich, D-Crosby, tweeted that his area would be a good location.\n\"This is purely to showcase the accomplishments of Farmington,\" Garofalo said.\n\n","Don Davis"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":34,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com/268","permalink":"http://lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com/2013/04/23/sick-and-tired/","blogid":"2780","blogdomain":"lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com","hostname":"lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Sick and Tired","content":"I am getting really sick and tired of hearing about these dumb people talking about the Boston Marathon bombing. I feel bad for the people that got hurt in the event and my prayers go out to them. But we do not need the event in a 24/7 news loop waiting for the most current (and most likely lies) to be reported. Events like this happen in the middle east due to are military but you don't hear a dam thing about it.\n\nI have stated this view to a bunch of people and some agree with me and some disagree with me. I have been called non american by these people, and for what? The person that has called my non American just happens to be a person from Canada here on a school visa maybe he is the next bombing person we need to look at. Also people have said that I have no heart at all. I have said I feel bad for the victims but I don't feel any sympathy for the event itself.\n\nThe reason for this is because people get the idea to kill people to get there message heard. In all honesty I blame the media for this. The media likes to send the message that if you want to be heard go kill a bunch of people or some famous person. I have to point out a serious flaw in this argument though. Which is,  I know my voice is not really heard and I write a few different blogs and am very loud on Facebook but since this only gets to a limited number of people it is complete waste of time. But according to the media the alternative is to go shoot people but I have morals and a soul and know better than to do that because I value life.","rawcontent":"I am getting really sick and tired of hearing about these dumb people talking about the Boston Marathon bombing. I feel bad for the people that got hurt in the event and my prayers go out to them. But we do not need the event in a 24/7 news loop waiting for the most current (and most likely lies) to be reported. Events like this happen in the middle east due to aremilitarybut youdon'thear a dam thing about it.\n\nI have stated this view to abunchof people and some agree with me and some disagree with me. I have been called non american by these people, and for what? The person that has called my non American just happens to be a person from Canada here on a school visa maybe he is the next bombing person we need to look at. Also people have said that I have no heart at all. I have said I feel bad for the victims but Idon'tfeel any sympathy for the event itself.\n\nThe reason for this is because people get the idea to kill people to get there message heard. In all honesty I blame the media for this. The media likes to send the message that if you want to be heard go kill a bunch of people or some famous person. I have to point out a serious flaw in this argument though. Which is, I know my voice is not really heard and I write a few different blogs and am very loud onFacebookbut since this only gets to a limited number of people it is complete waste of time. But according to the media the alternative is to go shoot people but I have morals and a soul and know better than to do that because I value life.","contentnoshortcodes":"I am getting really sick and tired of hearing about these dumb people talking about the Boston Marathon bombing. I feel bad for the people that got hurt in the event and my prayers go out to them. But we do not need the event in a 24/7 news loop waiting for the most current (and most likely lies) to be reported. Events like this happen in the middle east due to aremilitarybut youdon'thear a dam thing about it.\n\nI have stated this view to abunchof people and some agree with me and some disagree with me. I have been called non american by these people, and for what? The person that has called my non American just happens to be a person from Canada here on a school visa maybe he is the next bombing person we need to look at. Also people have said that I have no heart at all. I have said I feel bad for the victims but Idon'tfeel any sympathy for the event itself.\n\nThe reason for this is because people get the idea to kill people to get there message heard. In all honesty I blame the media for this. The media likes to send the message that if you want to be heard go kill a bunch of people or some famous person. I have to point out a serious flaw in this argument though. Which is, I know my voice is not really heard and I write a few different blogs and am very loud onFacebookbut since this only gets to a limited number of people it is complete waste of time. But according to the media the alternative is to go shoot people but I have morals and a soul and know better than to do that because I value life.","numcomments":0,"author":"Steven Weston","author_s":"http://lifeinrosemount.areavoices.com/author/oppie204/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-04-24T01:16:22Z","displaydate":"2013-04-23 20:16:22","displaymodified":"2013-04-23 20:16:38","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Sick and Tired","I am getting really sick and tired of hearing about these dumb people talking about the Boston Marathon bombing. I feel bad for the people that got hurt in the event and my prayers go out to them. But we do not need the event in a 24/7 news loop waiting for the most current (and most likely lies) to be reported. Events like this happen in the middle east due to are military but you don't hear a dam thing about it.\n\nI have stated this view to a bunch of people and some agree with me and some disagree with me. I have been called non american by these people, and for what? The person that has called my non American just happens to be a person from Canada here on a school visa maybe he is the next bombing person we need to look at. Also people have said that I have no heart at all. I have said I feel bad for the victims but I don't feel any sympathy for the event itself.\n\nThe reason for this is because people get the idea to kill people to get there message heard. In all honesty I blame the media for this. The media likes to send the message that if you want to be heard go kill a bunch of people or some famous person. I have to point out a serious flaw in this argument though. Which is,  I know my voice is not really heard and I write a few different blogs and am very loud on Facebook but since this only gets to a limited number of people it is complete waste of time. But according to the media the alternative is to go shoot people but I have morals and a soul and know better than to do that because I value life.","Steven Weston"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:thedifferencept.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:mysticlakegolf.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:dctc.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:september11.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":35,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/710","permalink":"http://aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/2012/10/27/home-sweet-home-china-in-minnesota/","blogid":"26621","blogdomain":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com","hostname":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Home Sweet Home: China in Minnesota","content":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org!  :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier. Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe. We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developing and America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morning where I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent. Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle. A neighborhood of three-story homes is a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo. Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.  This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.' Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out  a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded. (I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :)  It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or 再见 or good bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't think for a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released!  Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","rawcontent":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org! :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier.Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe.We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developingand America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morningwhere I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent.Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle.A neighborhood ofthree-story homesis a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo.Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.'Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded.(I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :) It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or orgood bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't thinkfor a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released! Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","contentnoshortcodes":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org! :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier.Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe.We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developingand America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morningwhere I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent.Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle.A neighborhood ofthree-story homesis a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo.Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded.(I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :) It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or orgood bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't thinkfor a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released! Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","numcomments":0,"author":"Brandon Ferdig","author_s":"http://aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/author/brandonferdig/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-10-27T16:31:33Z","displaydate":"2012-10-27 16:31:33","displaymodified":"2012-10-27 16:31:33","tags":["Bemidji","Blackduck","book","Buffalo","buffet","Chicago","Chinese food","eBook","headwaters","history","home","homecoming","Itasca State Park","Minneapolis","Mississippi River","New Plateaus","Shanghai","travel","Twin Cities","Zhuhai"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Home Sweet Home: China in Minnesota","All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org!  :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier. Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe. We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developing and America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morning where I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent. Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle. A neighborhood of three-story homes is a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo. Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.  This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.' Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out  a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded. (I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :)  It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or 再见 or good bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't think for a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released!  Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","Brandon Ferdig"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:notalonemom.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":165,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"notalonemom.areavoices.com/1065","permalink":"http://notalonemom.areavoices.com/2013/10/22/moms-arise-promo-video/","blogid":"26752","blogdomain":"notalonemom.areavoices.com","hostname":"notalonemom.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"ARISE Conference Promo Video October 2013","content":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","rawcontent":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Kristen L. Nelson","author_s":"http://notalonemom.areavoices.com/author/klnelson/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-10-22T15:08:06Z","displaydate":"2013-10-22 09:08:06","displaymodified":"2013-10-22 09:10:42","tags":["ARISE Conference","SheSays"],"categories":["Krissy Nelson","News","SheSays"],"spell":["ARISE Conference Promo Video October 2013","We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","Kristen L. Nelson"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:gardentalk.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":21,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"gardentalk.areavoices.com/331","permalink":"http://gardentalk.areavoices.com/2014/07/meandering-minds-want-to-know/","blogid":"29307","blogdomain":"gardentalk.areavoices.com","hostname":"gardentalk.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Meandering Minds Want to Know","content":"While looking for new ideas I've spent many hours wandering through garden centers, designing and redesigning landscapes and containers on the fly.  Putting plants in my wagon, changing my mind when I see something more interesting, putting back some or all of what I've already chosen and starting again.   Most often this is because I've arrived at the garden center without a plan.  Not having a plan while meandering through the garden centers, my thoughts turn to:\n\n\t  would that plant work in my garden?\n\t  what would I do with that?\n\t  what would be suitable companion plants with that really cool looking plant?\n\nMeandering through the garden center can bring more questions than answers.   However, here's an idea to find some of those answers - take some time to wander established home gardens!  Yes, there are people who will open their home gardens to the public and these garden tours are fabulous places to find some of the answers to those questions that pop into your head at the garden center.\n\nHere is information on a garden tour that looks to be a good one this weekend in Dakota County:  http://www.dakotamastergardeners.org/garden-tour-july-19-2014/\n\nI am always looking for new ideas so I may just see you there!","rawcontent":"While looking for new ideas I've spent many hourswandering through garden centers, designing and redesigning landscapes and containers on the fly. Putting plants in my wagon, changing my mind when I see something more interesting, putting back some or all of what I've already chosen and starting again. Most often this is because I've arrived at the garden center without a plan. Not having a planwhile meanderingthrough the garden centers, my thoughts turn to:\n\n would that plant work in my garden?\n what would I do with that?\n what would be suitable companion plants with that really cool looking plant?\n\nMeandering through the garden center can bring more questions than answers. However, here's an idea to find some of those answers -take some time to wander established home gardens! Yes, there are people who will open their home gardens to the public and these garden tours are fabulous places to find some of the answers to those questions that pop into your head at the garden center.\n\nHere is information on a garden tour that looks to be a good onethis weekend in Dakota County: http://www.dakotamastergardeners.org/garden-tour-july-19-2014/\n\nI am always looking for new ideas so I may just see you there!","contentnoshortcodes":"While looking for new ideas I've spent many hourswandering through garden centers, designing and redesigning landscapes and containers on the fly. Putting plants in my wagon, changing my mind when I see something more interesting, putting back some or all of what I've already chosen and starting again. Most often this is because I've arrived at the garden center without a plan. Not having a planwhile meanderingthrough the garden centers, my thoughts turn to:\n\n would that plant work in my garden?\n what would I do with that?\n what would be suitable companion plants with that really cool looking plant?\n\nMeandering through the garden center can bring more questions than answers. However, here's an idea to find some of those answers -take some time to wander established home gardens! Yes, there are people who will open their home gardens to the public and these garden tours are fabulous places to find some of the answers to those questions that pop into your head at the garden center.\n\nHere is information on a garden tour that looks to be a good onethis weekend in Dakota County: http://www.dakotamastergardeners.org/garden-tour-july-19-2014/\n\nI am always looking for new ideas so I may just see you there!","numcomments":0,"author":"DakotaMGs","author_s":"http://gardentalk.areavoices.com/author/brendascheer/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-16T01:31:20Z","displaydate":"2014-07-15 20:31:20","displaymodified":"2014-07-15 20:31:20","tags":["garden tour","shade","sun","vegetables"],"categories":["Education","Events","Events at the Garden","Garden Tour","Home Landscape","Perennials","Vegetable gardening"],"spell":["Meandering Minds Want to Know","While looking for new ideas I've spent many hours wandering through garden centers, designing and redesigning landscapes and containers on the fly.  Putting plants in my wagon, changing my mind when I see something more interesting, putting back some or all of what I've already chosen and starting again.   Most often this is because I've arrived at the garden center without a plan.  Not having a plan while meandering through the garden centers, my thoughts turn to:\n\n\t  would that plant work in my garden?\n\t  what would I do with that?\n\t  what would be suitable companion plants with that really cool looking plant?\n\nMeandering through the garden center can bring more questions than answers.   However, here's an idea to find some of those answers - take some time to wander established home gardens!  Yes, there are people who will open their home gardens to the public and these garden tours are fabulous places to find some of the answers to those questions that pop into your head at the garden center.\n\nHere is information on a garden tour that looks to be a good one this weekend in Dakota County:  http://www.dakotamastergardeners.org/garden-tour-july-19-2014/\n\nI am always looking for new ideas so I may just see you there!","DakotaMGs"]}]}} Rosemount Town Pages

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Andrea Langworthy's column: This one is for Ginny
July 20, 2014 - 8:00am
Nathan Hansen's column: There's no accounting for taste
July 20, 2014 - 8:00am
Police chase at DCTC ends peacefully
July 18, 2014 - 1:41pm
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Resident survey responses mostly positive
July 17, 2014 - 12:21pm
Former Brazilian exchange student Sergio Guerra was back in Minnesota visiting friends when he fell from a ladder and broke his hip. A member of the Rosemount High School class of 1987, Guerra
RHS grads rally around injured friend
July 17, 2014 - 1:44pm
New system makes sermons loud and clear
July 17, 2014 - 12:13pm
Dawn McCracken and Christy Macho have combined their home decor businesses to open a brick and mortar store in downtown Rosemount.
New boutique offers vintage charm
July 17, 2014 - 12:10pm
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Looking back: New telephone exchange went into effect for Rosemount 50 years ago
July 17, 2014 - 1:03pm
County looking for art to exhibit
July 17, 2014 - 12:46pm
Bluebirds ready to fledge
July 17, 2014 - 12:45pm
Expect delays along County Road 42 as crews improve the roadway surface as well as curb and access ramps.
CR 42 work will cause delays
July 9, 2014 - 2:04pm
Editorial: New park is an exciting addition
July 17, 2014 - 11:15am
Rosemount wide receiver Simon Hatlen snags a pass over the middle during 7-on-7 practice last Wednesday morning. The 7-on-7 practices, along with strength and conditioning training, team camps and team retreats are part of off-season preparation for the Farmington and Rosemount football teams.
Football teams putting in the work
July 16, 2014 - 8:33pm
Neighbors can celebrate togetherness Aug. 5
July 17, 2014 - 12:01pm
New contract approved for superintendent
July 17, 2014 - 11:58am
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